Does NMN help cancer grow faster? – ALIVE BY SCIENCE – Bioavailable NAD+ Boosters

Does NMN help cancer grow faster?

No. New research shows that it has no impact on tumor growth.

People often ask if NMN could promote tumor growth or proliferation of cancer.

This study found that NMN supplementation did not have an impact on tumor growth.

NMN does not prevent formation of lung cancer or restrain tumor growth in a mouse xenograft model, nor does it promote tumor growth.”

The Role of NMN in Relation to Lung Cancer Tumor Growth

In this study, researchers investigated the role of NMN supplementation as it relates to tumor growth. Mice were pretreated with NMN for two weeks, then they were subcutaneously injected with mouse lung cancer cells to form tumors.

When the tumor volume reached about 300 mm3, NMN was then intraperitoneally injected for three weeks. The tumor incidence, tumor size and volume were then measured.

“The tumor formation rate and cell proliferation in the tumor were studied. The role of NMN in tumor formation and lung cancer progression in vivo was fully investigated.”

No Difference Between the Control & NMN Group Tumors

There was no difference in tumor size and volume in the control group versus the NMN group.

“NMN does not affect the proliferation of tumor cells in vivo.”

 

Weight Loss Observed in NMN-Treated Mice

Interestingly, it was observed that mice treated with NMN experienced notable weight loss.

It was found that the weight of NMN treated nude mice significantly reduced, which is consistent with former studies.”

 

Speculation About NAD+ Being Associated with Cancer

Scientists know that cancer uses NAD+ to help fuel it’s growth, leading to speculation that cutting off NAD+ supply may hinder it’s growth, and conversely, that supplying exogenous NAD+ boosters may help it grow faster.

This is all speculation. To date, attempts to decrease the supply of NAD+ to combat cancer has been unsuccessful.

Conversely, no research has ever shown an increase in cancer incidence or severity due to NMN supplementation.

This 2016 study gave NMN to mice for 12 months, and found no increased incidence of cancer.

Other Research Explores Increasing NAD+ Levels to Aid Immune System in Fighting Cancer

According to this 2021 paper, researchers are exploring the use of exogenous NAD+ and/or inhibition of the CD38 enzyme to increase NAD+ supply to aid the immune system in fighting cancer. The recent evidence highlights the role of NAD+ as a key factor in the anti-tumor T cell response.

“NAD+ depletion brought about by immunosuppressive mechanisms, which involve NAD+-consuming enzymes, may dampen T cell functions. Thus, pharmacological interventions aimed at restoring NAD+ levels may increase the efficacy of standard therapies for patients with solid and hematological tumors.”

Conclusion: There Is No Evidence That NMN Supplementation Aids Tumor Growth

No study has ever found an increase in cancer due to NMN supplementation. According to this study, NMN did not promote growth of existing tumors in mice.

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