Healthy Aging News and ResearchPartial reprogramming reverse epigenetic age

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AlbertY
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Partial reprogramming reverse epigenetic age

Post by AlbertY » Tue Aug 25, 2020 3:55 pm

Check this new paper on partial reprogramming! It's a proof of concept that partial reprogramming can safely reverse aging!

Partial reprogramming induces a steady decline in epigenetic age before loss of somatic identity https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/ful ... acel.12877

Induced pluripotent stem cells (IPSCs), with their unlimited regenerative capacity, carry the promise for tissue replacement to counter age‐related decline. However, attempts to realize in vivo iPSC have invariably resulted in the formation of teratomas. Partial reprogramming in prematurely aged mice has shown promising results in alleviating age‐related symptoms without teratoma formation. Does partial reprogramming lead to rejuvenation (i.e., “younger” cells), rather than dedifferentiation, which bears the risk of cancer? Here, we analyse the dynamics of cellular age during human iPSC reprogramming and find that partial reprogramming leads to a reduction in the epigenetic age of cells. We also find that the loss of somatic gene expression and epigenetic age follows different kinetics, suggesting that they can be uncoupled and there could be a safe window where rejuvenation can be achieved with a minimized risk of cancer.


Ph.D. student at Harvard Medical School, doing research on aging
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jocko6889
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Re: Partial reprogramming reverse epigenetic age

Post by jocko6889 » Tue Aug 25, 2020 11:28 pm

AlbertY wrote:
Tue Aug 25, 2020 3:55 pm
Check this new paper on partial reprogramming! It's a proof of concept that partial reprogramming can safely reverse aging!

Partial reprogramming induces a steady decline in epigenetic age before loss of somatic identity https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/ful ... acel.12877

Induced pluripotent stem cells (IPSCs), with their unlimited regenerative capacity, carry the promise for tissue replacement to counter age‐related decline. However, attempts to realize in vivo iPSC have invariably resulted in the formation of teratomas. Partial reprogramming in prematurely aged mice has shown promising results in alleviating age‐related symptoms without teratoma formation. Does partial reprogramming lead to rejuvenation (i.e., “younger” cells), rather than dedifferentiation, which bears the risk of cancer? Here, we analyse the dynamics of cellular age during human iPSC reprogramming and find that partial reprogramming leads to a reduction in the epigenetic age of cells. We also find that the loss of somatic gene expression and epigenetic age follows different kinetics, suggesting that they can be uncoupled and there could be a safe window where rejuvenation can be achieved with a minimized risk of cancer.

 
This is exciting news!  I'm wondering just how far back they've managed to roll back the epigenome?  It sounds like a significant discovery.
 
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AlbertY
Posts: 158
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Location: Boston, MA

Re: Partial reprogramming reverse epigenetic age

Post by AlbertY » Tue Sep 01, 2020 10:36 pm

jocko6889 wrote:
Tue Aug 25, 2020 11:28 pm
AlbertY wrote:
Tue Aug 25, 2020 3:55 pm
Check this new paper on partial reprogramming! It's a proof of concept that partial reprogramming can safely reverse aging!

Partial reprogramming induces a steady decline in epigenetic age before loss of somatic identity https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/ful ... acel.12877

Induced pluripotent stem cells (IPSCs), with their unlimited regenerative capacity, carry the promise for tissue replacement to counter age‐related decline. However, attempts to realize in vivo iPSC have invariably resulted in the formation of teratomas. Partial reprogramming in prematurely aged mice has shown promising results in alleviating age‐related symptoms without teratoma formation. Does partial reprogramming lead to rejuvenation (i.e., “younger” cells), rather than dedifferentiation, which bears the risk of cancer? Here, we analyse the dynamics of cellular age during human iPSC reprogramming and find that partial reprogramming leads to a reduction in the epigenetic age of cells. We also find that the loss of somatic gene expression and epigenetic age follows different kinetics, suggesting that they can be uncoupled and there could be a safe window where rejuvenation can be achieved with a minimized risk of cancer.


 
This is exciting news!  I'm wondering just how far back they've managed to roll back the epigenome?  It sounds like a significant discovery.
 

 
Almost to 0 year-old -- fully reversal! The problem here is that if we reprogram to much, the cell will be de-differentiated to stem cell like cell. It will cause loss of original cell function and risk of teratoma (a special type of cancer).
Ph.D. student at Harvard Medical School, doing research on aging
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jocko6889
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Re: Partial reprogramming reverse epigenetic age

Post by jocko6889 » Tue Sep 01, 2020 11:12 pm

AlbertY wrote:
Tue Sep 01, 2020 10:36 pm
jocko6889 wrote:
Tue Aug 25, 2020 11:28 pm
AlbertY wrote:
Tue Aug 25, 2020 3:55 pm
Check this new paper on partial reprogramming! It's a proof of concept that partial reprogramming can safely reverse aging!

Partial reprogramming induces a steady decline in epigenetic age before loss of somatic identity https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/ful ... acel.12877

Induced pluripotent stem cells (IPSCs), with their unlimited regenerative capacity, carry the promise for tissue replacement to counter age‐related decline. However, attempts to realize in vivo iPSC have invariably resulted in the formation of teratomas. Partial reprogramming in prematurely aged mice has shown promising results in alleviating age‐related symptoms without teratoma formation. Does partial reprogramming lead to rejuvenation (i.e., “younger” cells), rather than dedifferentiation, which bears the risk of cancer? Here, we analyse the dynamics of cellular age during human iPSC reprogramming and find that partial reprogramming leads to a reduction in the epigenetic age of cells. We also find that the loss of somatic gene expression and epigenetic age follows different kinetics, suggesting that they can be uncoupled and there could be a safe window where rejuvenation can be achieved with a minimized risk of cancer.




 
This is exciting news!  I'm wondering just how far back they've managed to roll back the epigenome?  It sounds like a significant discovery.
 



 
Almost to 0 year-old -- fully reversal! The problem here is that if we reprogram to much, the cell will be de-differentiated to stem cell like cell. It will cause loss of original cell function and risk of teratoma (a special type of cancer).


 
Yes, you would not want to become a zygote!  In fact, figuring out how to turn on and off the deaging process is almost as important as the process itself.  Resetting to age 27, the peak of your prime, would be good provided the process was repeatable every few years or so.  I understand that's what Sinclair was working on after the experiments with deaging the optic nerve in mice.... could the process be repeated?  You would think so but I haven't heard.
 
 
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